Tomas Gutierrez

This is our first time releasing a honey processed coffee as a single origin, and we think we've chosen a great one to be the first. 

What is a honey process? Well, first of all, it doesn't actually involve using any honey. When the cherries are removed from the trees, there are many ways to remove the fruit to get to the beans (which are actually seeds) inside. Tomas Gutierrez and his farm manager Guillermo Lopez oversee the picking of the cherries, with the harvest ending one hour early in order to re-sort all the coffee to be delivered. Next, the mill puts the cherries in water, taking out all the defective cherries that float to the surface, allowing a cleaner final product. After the floats, they  depulp the coffee using a Phinalense 4 module system, taking away around 90% of the mucilage. The amount of mucilage left on is what determins what "colour" of honey process the coffee is. The fruit will ferment and get sticky (hence the word honey) and the more fruit mucilage left on, the darker it will get. This White Honey, only having a small amount of fruit left on, ferments just a little bit, bringing out a nice body and fruit sweetness. The next morning the coffee starts the drying proccess using african beds. Normally one quintal is loaded per bed allowing for a one inch layer of coffee beans. Next, the coffee will be turned every hour during the day, allowing a better drying process and quality. Since its inside a green house, it’s easier to have control over the temperature around 30 °C.  Finally, after 4 days, the coffee will be loaded at the mechanical drier just to finish the drying process.

The Finca Vargas and Guttierrez farm was created by a team of agricultural and industrial engineers along with a geologist, and they are applying all their knowledge of soil management and processing to create sustainable and delicious coffee. 

This particular selection is a H1 Centroamericano varietal, meaning it is a hybrid of an Ethiopian Rume Sudan species and the Sarchimore (which is resistant to leaf rust, a major problem in coffee growing regions right now). The result is a coffee that is of high quality, lower risk and good yields. It grows best in shade, which encourages farmers to grow on smaller scales using the shade of trees in small agro-forest areas. 

When we drink this coffee, it makes us think of black tea infused with rosehip and other florals, as well those biscuits your grandparents have with the plum jelly in the middle. But as always, you may experience something completely different, and that is absolutely okay. 

 

A note on roast dates: 

Contrary to most coffee myths (based off old information), it's best not to use coffee that is too fresh. For espresso, we recommend using coffee between three days to four weeks old, while filter and drip coffee it's best if the beans are three weeks to twelve weeks from the date of roasting.

Contrary to most coffee myths (based off old information), it's best not to use coffee that is too fresh. For espresso, we recommend using coffee between three days to four weeks old, while filter and drip coffee it's best if the beans are three weeks to twelve weeks from the date of roasting. If you would like your coffee already rested, please let us know in the comment section of your order and we will do our best to fulfill your order with rested coffee, if we have it available. Please note that based on fluctuating order amounts, we won't always have rested coffee available at the time you order, and you are welcome to reach out to us to check on our inventory levels for rested coffee before ordering. 

 

 

Tomas Gutierrez